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20121231
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CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 5:00pm EST
some miserably. >> host: why some many lawyers? >> guest: no good reason. we have very restrictive rules of engagement. how we choose. and we drop a bomb, the lawyer, is a syndicate target? to close? is it too close to a school? become in this way. here is how many people may get killed as collateral damage. when you do that for the libyan campaign much less syria or k-9 or afghanistan you're talking about hundreds of targets needing lots of lawyers. the society. all lot of reason for having lots and lots of lawyers. we have more lawyers than probably anyone of the services in the entire department. >> caller: my question would be why after the iraq more whenever we gave these people an opportunity for liberty we did not pay for some of the assets of the country as far as their oil production to pay our debt and what we spent to give them the choice of freedom. thank you. >> guest: that raises an interesting question because we did the first goal for desert storm, we actually went around hat in hand to the various countries, including countries that had not participated in the exer
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2012 9:00am EST
a miserable economy, but we certainly don't have a freefall fiscal disaster with financial institutions collapsing. we don't have the fall of 2008 anymore. there's actually quite a lot of stability in financial institutions. and you could have a very interesting debate about whether this was ever a good idea, but i don't understand how you can justify it now, in an environment where -- that doesn't even faintl faintly rese the crisis circumstances of 2008. and if we're going to extend it now for two more years when there's clearly no need for it, it certainly seems to me to suggest an interest in making this a permanent feature of the american banking system -- permanent, unlimited, guarantees the socialization of deposits in country this country, which i think is a terrible idea. secondly, this a big contingent liability for taxpayers. it's about $1.5 trillion in deposits right now that fall into this category and are being guaranteed and would continue to be guaranteed if the guarantee were extended. it's also worth 2340e9in notings mostly benefits the big banks. big banks have a disp
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 5:00pm EST
%. and it's not about being a miser. it's not about wanting to save money. it's about prudence. it's about sound judgments. it's about common sense. what do we know from the 1988 stafford act? here's what we know. what we know is when we changed the cost share to an appropriate level so that we don't get things done on the federal government's taxpayer dime without significant participation of local input, what the studies show is that during that one-year period, the federal government saved $3 billion because projects didn't get funded that weren't priorities because of the 65% federal contribution and 35% cost share. so what this does is reintroduce the 65% federal payment and 35% cost share to do that. and, again, most of these projects aren't going to start until 2015. so priorities are important. so we're borrowing $60 billion -- and this is just the first bill, i'm told, and i'm sure we're going to have to spend money. but should we not be more prudent with how we spend dollars that are going to be borrowed against our children's future? all this says is revert it back to what it's
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2012 9:00am EST
, it would help the republican candidates. it didn't work, but they sure tried and they made life miserable on election day for millions of americans who were just trying to do their civic duty. too many people stood in long lines. too many people were unable to vote because they couldn't wait in long lines. in florida, for example, published reports indicate some voters waited in line as long as seven hours. couldn't cast their ballots until 2:30 in the morning. now, why would a voter hang in there? some of them were just mad, mad that the state of florida and this republican-inspired organization, alec, was doing everything it could to deny their right to vote, and they were darned determined to do it, even if it meant staying there seven hours, seven hours to vote. too many people were required to cast provisional ballots when they were, in fact, eligible and should have received a regular ballot. pennsylvania, for example, issued double the number of provisional ballots it did in 2008. now, the provisional ballot is given to a voter where there is some question as to their eligibility.
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 12:00pm EST
because it's what they did instead of counting and miserably in the back to the drawing board. but my preference would have been to have somebody from the outside sitting down and doing it in a reasonable fashion, so that's best for the country, what's best for the district, what's best for the state. >> tying into all of this of the role of parties. more americans over the course of your tenure identify themselves as political. what has that done to the party during the past couple decades? >> not as much as super committees. in the citizens united case that's probably been more on maybe some of the other things with less partisanship and less willingness to come together. i happen to agree on the political parties but in nebraska the nebraska legislature is a officially nonpartisan. some people just run for the seat. they don't run as republicans or democrats. generally republicans are, democrats are, but it's not uncommon for democrats to be chairmen of committees even if there's a majority of republicans unofficially. so i come from an environment there was spirit and was spun by
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5